International Studies & Programs

Faculty Directory

The Center for Gender in Global Context currently has more than 275 affiliated faculty members from throughout MSU's campus, across 17 colleges and more than 65 departments and offices.

The GenCen Faculty Directory can be sorted by Name, College, Department, and GenCen Affiliation. Affiliates can be Core, Consulting, GJEC, or GDG Faculty (some members may be both GJEC/GDG and Core or Consulting). Click here to jump to a short description of our Faculty Affiliations.

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Gary Schnakenberg
College: Social Science
Department: Geography
Affiliation:
Program: GJEC
Email: schnake2(at)msu.ed

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Biography: Gary Schnakenberg's areas of interest include nature-society studies, critical cultural geographies of agriculture, and undergraduate education.

Anne Schneller
College: International Studies and Programs
Department: Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics
Affiliation: Core
Program: GDG
Email: annes(at)msu.edu

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Biography: Anne Schneller is Associate Director of the Borlaug Higher Education for Agricultural Research and Development (BHEARD) Program in the Department of Agricultural, Food and Resource Economics. Anne has worked in the field of international education and tinernational student recruitment at Michigan State University for over 25 years. She has also worked on education projects in many countries in Africa, and has lived and worked in Zambia, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Kenya and South Africa. Anne has designed and co-directed study abroad programs for MSU undergraduate and masters degree students in both Zimbabwe and South Africa for 15 years.

Jayne Schuiteman
College: Office of Institutional Equity
Department: Office of Institutional Equity
Affiliation: Core
Program:
Email: schuite1(at)msu.edu

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Biography: Dr. Jayne Schuiteman is a senior investigator with the Office of Institutional Equity (OIE) at Michigan State University. She is also an associate professor for the Center for Gender in Global Context and currently teaches Gender Studies courses for the Center. Dr. Schuiteman received her Bachelor’s degree from Calvin College and both her Master’s degree and Ph.D. from Michigan State University. Dr. Schuiteman first began working with issues of harassment and discrimination in 1992 while employed at the Women’s Resource Center and has continued into her present position with OIE.

Johanna Schuster-Craig
College: Arts and Letters
Department: Linguistics and German, Slavic, Asian, and African Languages
Affiliation: Core
Program:
Email: schust66(at)msu.edu

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Biography:

Johanna Schuster-Craig is Assistant Professor of German and Global Studies. Her research interests center around German integration politics and immigration policy, both from the top down (in the media, public policies and parliamentary debates) and from the bottom up (in social work projects and the work of local artists). She is particularly interested in how previous incarnations of integration politics have served as precursors for emerging right-wing xenophobic movements such as PEGIDA.

Lisa Schwartzman
College: Arts and Letters
Department: Philosophy
Affiliation: Core
Program:
Email: lhschwar(at)msu.edu

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Biography: Lisa Schwartzman is the author of Challenging Liberalism: Feminism as Political Critique (Penn State Press, 2006) and co-editor of Feminist Interventions in Ethics and Politics (Rowman and Littlefield, 2005). She has also published essays on feminist analyses of rights, equality, and hate speech. She is co-editing a special issue of the Journal of Social Philosophy on the topic Gender, Implicit Bias, and Philosophical Methodology. Prof. Schwartzman's current work focuses on two related projects: the first involves examining the role that choice and autonomy play in contemporary discussions of feminism, and the second involves a critical feminist analysis of philosophical methodologies.

Ethan Segal
College: Social Science
Department: History
Affiliation: Core
Program: GDG
Email: segale(at)msu.edu

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Biography: Ethan Segal is a scholar of traditional East Asia with a particular focus on Japan. He earned his M.A. from the University of Washington, his Ph.D. from Stanford University, and was a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Tokyo. In 2008-09, he was Visiting Assistant Professor of Pre-modern Japanese History in Harvard University's Department of East Asian Languages & Civilizations. Topics of Professor Segal's research and teaching include economic history, nationalism, women and gender, history and film, contemporary popular culture, and Japanese textbooks. His publications appear in journals such as Education About Asia as well as in edited volumes including Currents in Medieval Japanese History and Economic Thought in Early Modern Japan. Professor Segal's first book, Coins, Trade, and the State: Economic Growth in Early Medieval Japan, re-examines money, trade, and evolving medieval political and social institutions; it is available from Harvard University Press.

Morgan Shipley
College: Arts and Letters
Department: Religious Studies
Affiliation: Core
Program:
Email: shiple18(at)msu.edu

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Biography:

Morgan Shipley is Visiting Assistant Professor and Academic Advisor in the Department of Religious Studies. Morgan is co-editor of The Silence of Fallout: Nuclear Criticism in a Post-Cold War World (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2013), and author of Psychedelic Mysticism: Transforming Consciousness, Religious Experiences, and Voluntary Peasants in Postwar America (Lexington Books, 2015). He has published widely in peer-reviewed journals, edited anthologies, and encyclopedias on various topics, from doomsday cults to debates in comparative mysticism to the mad and sacred art of the Beat Generation and Jean-Michel Basquiat. Concerned with historical and contemporary mechanisms of marginalization, oppression, and empowerment, his research operates at the intersection of religion, identity, and politics, with a particular focus on how religious values and perspectives in America have operated to delineate gendered, racial, and economic disenfranchisement, while also offering alternative routes to pursue and advance social justice causes. Much of his research highlights how popular culture functions as an educational heuristic, often providing American audiences with their first introduction to non-Christian religious traditions and practices, transnational flows of religious culture, new religious movements based in global spiritual perspectives/appropriation, and non-normative identity structures found within varied global religions (e.g., third gender, and specifically the implications, contexts, and results of third gender gods and people being ascribed spiritual powers by many indigenous cultures). In addition to a fully-drafted article that looks at the comic Ms. Marvel in order to unpack Islamic representations and corresponding gendered symbols, as well as a fully-outlined manuscript length project—Mystics and Misogynists: Recovering the Lost Voices of Women Visionaries and Prophets in America—that critically interrogates how both American religious history and the field of religious studies has relegated women mystics to the role of secondary (or non-existent) actors, Morgan recently completed eight original entries for the Encyclopedia of Women in World Religions: Faith and Culture Across History (ABC-CLIO, Forthcoming 2018) that explore how the fields of history and religious studies remember the space and place of women religious actors, specifically in relation to moments predicated on blaming or demonizing (e.g., “Women and The Fall,” “Women’s Divination,” or “Women and Kabbalah”), idealizing and sexualizing (e.g., “Eleusinian Mysteries” or “Gaea”), or relegating and disenfranchising (e.g., “Women’s Native American Activism,” “Native American Medicine Women,” and “Women in Hasidism”).

Robin Silbergleid
College: Arts and Letters
Department: English
Affiliation: Core
Program:
Email: silberg1(at)msu.edu

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Biography:

Robin Silbergleid works in the areas of creative writing (poetry and creative nonfiction), twentieth- and twenty-first century American literature and culture, narrative theory, and women's/gender studies. As a writer who holds both a PhD and MFA, she is particularly interested in exploring the sometimes vexed relationships between critical and creative writing; her current project, Reading Maso, combines sustained close readings of Carole Maso's novels with personal essay and poetic fragments. Additionally, she is co-editing a book, Critical Innovations: Reading and Writing Experimental Texts that explores performative and creative modes of literary analysis. Her creative work focuses on issues of domesticity and the female body, specifically single parenting, reproductive loss, and infertility. She is the author of the poetry collection The Baby Book (CavanKerry Press, 2015) and the memoir Texas Girl (Demeter Press, 2014), as well as the chapbooks Pas de Deux: Prose and Other Poems (Basilisk Press, 2006) and Frida Kahlo, My Sister (Finishing Line, 2014). Individual essays and poems can be found in a range of venues, online and in print, and have been twice nominated for the Pushcart Prize. She is a frequent contributor to Role Reboot on issues related to fertility and family, and collaborates with the national art, oral history, and portraiture project The ART of Infertility.

Le Anne Silvey
College: Social Science
Department: Human Development and Family Studies
Affiliation: Core
Program:
Email: silveyle(at)msu.edu

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Biography: Le Anne E. Silvey, Ph.D., ACSW, LMSW earned a docorate in Family Studies from Michigan State University in 1997, with a cognate in Sociology. She is a member of the Academy of Certified Social Workers and is a Licensed Masters Social Worker, Micro and Macro practice. Dr. Silvey is Waganakising Odawa, Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians and is a first generation college graduate. Dr. Silvey joined the faculty of HDFS in August, 1999, after holding an Assistant Professor position in the graduate School of Social Work at Grand Valley State University for three years. Since 2001, she has been an Affiliate Faculty member of the American Indian Studies Program at MSU and is a Core Faculty Member of the Women in International Development Program. Clinically, Dr. Silvey has over a decade of practice in Indian Child Welfare on a statewide basis and has served on the State Native American Task Force and Native American Implementation Team for Michigan.

Jyotsna Singh
College: Arts and Letters
Department: English
Affiliation: Core
Program: GDG
Email: jsingh(at)msu.edu

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Biography: Jyotsna G Singh researches and teaches early modern literature and culture, colonial history, travel writing, postcolonial theory, and gender and race studies, often exploring the intersections of these different fields. Her published work includes The Weyward Sisters: Shakespeare and Feminist Politics co-authored with Dympna Callaghan and Lorraine Helms (Blackwell 1994); Colonial Narratives/Cultural Dialogues: 'Discovery' of India in the Language of Colonialism (Routledge 1996); and Travel Knowledge: European 'Discoveries' in the Early Modern Period (co-edited Ivo Kamps, Palgrave, 2001); and A Companion to the Global Renaissance: English Literature and Culture in the Era of Expansion editor, Blackwell 2009). She has written extensively on early modern drama and culture, with an emphasis on Shakespeare; cross-cultural performances/appropriations of Shakespeare; early modern travel narratives; history of race and gender; and colonialism, among others.


What do our Faculty Affiliations Mean?

Core Faculty have a strong continuing professional focus on issues of women and gender in domestic, international, or global contexts, as demonstrated through research and teaching or other achievements. The Core Faculty supports the activities of GenCen and assists in developing and implementing its programs and activities, and are also eligible to serve on the GenCen Advisory Committee.

Consulting Faculty, while having a professional interest in issues of women and gender in domestic, international, or global contexts and activities of the GenCen, usually do not have these interests as the main focus of their research. 

GDG (Gender, Development and Globalization) Faculty will also be either Core or Consulting Faculty and have specific expertise and interest in gender and international development.

GJEC (Gender, Justice and Environmental Change) Faculty may also be either Core or Consulting Faculty, though that is not a requirement. GJEC Faculty are dedicated to teaching and scholarship related to intersections of gender, environmental change, and social and environmental justice; examining these issues from both local and global perspectives.

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