International Studies & Programs

Faculty Directory

The Center for Gender in Global Context currently has more than 275 affiliated faculty members from throughout MSU's campus, across 17 colleges and more than 65 departments and offices.

The GenCen Faculty Directory can be sorted by Name, College, Department, and GenCen Affiliation. Affiliates can be Core, Consulting, GJEC, or GDG Faculty (some members may be both GJEC/GDG and Core or Consulting). Click here to jump to a short description of our Faculty Affiliations.

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Lisa Schwartzman
College: Arts and Letters
Department: Philosophy
Affiliation: Core
Program:
Email: lhschwar(at)msu.edu

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Biography: Lisa Schwartzman is the author of Challenging Liberalism: Feminism as Political Critique (Penn State Press, 2006) and co-editor of Feminist Interventions in Ethics and Politics (Rowman and Littlefield, 2005). She has also published essays on feminist analyses of rights, equality, and hate speech. She is co-editing a special issue of the Journal of Social Philosophy on the topic Gender, Implicit Bias, and Philosophical Methodology. Prof. Schwartzman's current work focuses on two related projects: the first involves examining the role that choice and autonomy play in contemporary discussions of feminism, and the second involves a critical feminist analysis of philosophical methodologies.

Juli Wade
College: Social Science
Department: Psychology
Affiliation: Consulting
Program:
Email: wadej(at)msu.edu

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Biography: The Wade lab investigates how structural and biochemical changes within the brain across development regulate later social behaviors. They study the development of courtship and copulatory displays because these displays are stereotyped and differ between the sexes. Members of the Wade lab are working with two model systems, zebra finches and green anole lizards. Zebra finches have become a classic model for investigating sex differences in brain and behavior. Males sing to court females, whereas females do not normally sing, and in parallel the brain regions and muscles that control song are larger in males than in females. The Wade lab investigates how hormones and genes contribute to the development of behavioral and anatomical differences between the sexes. Similarly, green anole lizards display highly sexually dimorphic courtship behaviors. Males extend a bright red throat fan called a dewlap. Females have only a rudimentary dewlap, and while they use it in a limited fashion during aggressive encounters, females do not display the dewlap during reproduction. The neurons and muscles controlling this behavior are larger in males than in females. The Wade labs current research on the lizards involves investigations of the influences of steroid hormones during development and in adulthood on both morphology and behavior in these two reproductive systems.

Janet Swenson
College: Arts and Letters
Department: Writing, Rhetoric, and American Cultures
Affiliation: Consulting
Program:
Email: jswenson(at)msu.edu

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Biography: Janet Swenson is an Associate Professor in WRAC and Associate Dean of Outreach and Community Engagement in the College of Arts and Letters. She began her career as a middle and high school teacher in Flint Community Schools. She has served as the (co)director of several national projects including Write for Your Life and Project Outreach, as well as such local projects as Red Cedar Writing Project and Project WRITE. Swenson has served on the Executive Committee of NCTE, Chair of the Conference on English Education, and Member of the National Writing Project Task Force. Her current research interests focus on improving the teaching and practice of writing in highly diverse K-12 classrooms.

Chantal Tetreault
College: Social Science
Department: Anthropology
Affiliation: Core
Program:
Email: tetreau7(at)msu.edu

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Biography: Chantal Tetreault is a linguistic and cultural anthropologist whose recent work has primarily focused on issues of migration and social change in France. Dr. Tetreault's current project addresses the interactional styles whereby French adolescents of Algerian descent construct and express their emergent identities as Arab Muslims and French youth. More generally, her research illuminates how cultural processes of identity construction, primarily relating to gender and ethnicity, are achieved through everyday language use. Professor Tetreault's publications and teaching both challenge naturalized assumptions about the link between identity and language, thereby contributing to new scholarship in linguistic anthropology that rejects the previously common pattern of equating cultural groups and particular language styles.

Ellen Velie
College: Human Medicine
Department: Epidemiology and Biostatistics
Affiliation: Core
Program:
Email: velie(at)msu.edu

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Biography: Ellen Velie is a nutritional and cancer epidemiologist with a particular interest in the health of disadvantaged populations. She joined the Department of Epidemiology at Michigan State University in August, 2000. Before coming to MSU she conducted her PhD research on nutrition and birth defects in Latina and white women in California and completed postdoctoral training through the Cancer Prevention Fellowship in the Nutritional Epidemiology Branch at the National Cancer Institute. Examples of her research include the role of nutrient intakes (e.g. fat and zinc) and dietary patterns in the etiology of birth defects and breast cancer. She has also studied methodologic issues related to nutritional epidemiology, such as dietary assessment, energy-adjustment and alternative approaches to examining dose response trends. Her current research focuses on the interrelationship between social factors (e.g. race and social class) and life course energy balance-related factors (e.g. birth characteristics, childhood diet and growth, pubertal development, diet, physical activity, insulin resistance and obesity), as they relate to cancer and other diseases.

Ethan Segal
College: Social Science
Department: History
Affiliation: Core
Program: GDG
Email: segale(at)msu.edu

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Biography: Ethan Segal is a scholar of traditional East Asia with a particular focus on Japan. He earned his M.A. from the University of Washington, his Ph.D. from Stanford University, and was a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Tokyo. In 2008-09, he was Visiting Assistant Professor of Pre-modern Japanese History in Harvard University's Department of East Asian Languages & Civilizations. Topics of Professor Segal's research and teaching include economic history, nationalism, women and gender, history and film, contemporary popular culture, and Japanese textbooks. His publications appear in journals such as Education About Asia as well as in edited volumes including Currents in Medieval Japanese History and Economic Thought in Early Modern Japan. Professor Segal's first book, Coins, Trade, and the State: Economic Growth in Early Medieval Japan, re-examines money, trade, and evolving medieval political and social institutions; it is available from Harvard University Press.

Leonora Smith
College: Arts and Letters
Department: Writing, Rhetoric, and American Cultures
Affiliation: Core
Program:
Email: smithleo(at)msu.edu

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Biography: Smith has a dual Ph.D. in English and Curriculum from MSU, with an emphasis on research in the teaching of writing at the college level and above. With stints as a waitress and bartender, she is now an associate professor of Writing, Rhetoric, and American Cultures at Michigan State University. She has worked as a free-lance writer for government and industry; as editor of Muses (the alumni magazine of MSU's College of Arts & Letters); as associate editor for Years Press; former president of the Society for the Study of Midwestern Literature; and served on the editorial board of Fourth Genre.

Aminda Smith
College: Social Science
Department: History
Affiliation: Core
Program: GDG
Email: amsmith(at)msu.edu

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Biography: I specialize in modern Chinese history with a particular interest in the social and cultural history of Chinese Communism. My recent book, Thought Reform and China's Dangerous Classes: Reeducation, Resistance, and the People, explores what is arguably the Chinese government's most controversial social policy thought reform or reeducation. I pay special attention to the prostitutes, beggars, and other lumpen proletarians that the Communists saw as dangerous to society and the revolution. To hear me discussing this book, listen to an interview from the New Books podcast series. My current work in PRC history (tentatively titled Speaking for the People: Protest, Petitions, and Populism in the Mao Years) examines the richly detailed letters that rural and urban citizens sent to the Communist state. Additionally, I am continuing my ongoing research on Chinese doctors in the U.S. (project title: The Private Diseases of Both Sexes: Race, Sexuality, and Chinese Medicine in the American West, 1850 -1950) in which I consider the reputation Chinese-American doctors built for themselves as expert healers of venereal disease.

Brenda Sternquist
College: Communication Arts and Sciences
Department: Advertising and Public Relations
Affiliation: Core
Program: GDG
Email: sternqui(at)msu.edu

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Biography: Brenda Sternquist, Professor of Marketing at Michigan State University, is a specialist in International Retailing. She has conducted research throughout the world, but particularly focuses on China, India and Japan. This research is summarized in her book, International Retailing 2nd edition published by Fairchild Press, New York in 2007. Her first book focused on the European transition, this book European Retailing's' Borderless World was published by Greenwood Press. Two 2011 books are Retail Strategic International Expansion: Theory and Cases and International Retailing Theory and Research. She has also published more than one hundred research articles. She was selected as the first Outstanding National Retail Educator in 2004. The award is presented by the National Retail Federation, Center for Retail Studies Texas A&M and JC Penney. In 1999 she received the Michigan State University Distinguished Faculty Award, the highest award given at Michigan State University in recognition of an outstanding career in research, teaching and service, and was selected for the Alumnae Club of Mid-Michigan Quality in Undergraduate Teaching Award in 1997.

Jyotsna Singh
College: Arts and Letters
Department: English
Affiliation: Core
Program: GDG
Email: jsingh(at)msu.edu

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Biography: Jyotsna G Singh researches and teaches early modern literature and culture, colonial history, travel writing, postcolonial theory, and gender and race studies, often exploring the intersections of these different fields. Her published work includes The Weyward Sisters: Shakespeare and Feminist Politics co-authored with Dympna Callaghan and Lorraine Helms (Blackwell 1994); Colonial Narratives/Cultural Dialogues: 'Discovery' of India in the Language of Colonialism (Routledge 1996); and Travel Knowledge: European 'Discoveries' in the Early Modern Period (co-edited Ivo Kamps, Palgrave, 2001); and A Companion to the Global Renaissance: English Literature and Culture in the Era of Expansion editor, Blackwell 2009). She has written extensively on early modern drama and culture, with an emphasis on Shakespeare; cross-cultural performances/appropriations of Shakespeare; early modern travel narratives; history of race and gender; and colonialism, among others.


What do our Faculty Affiliations Mean?

Core Faculty have a strong continuing professional focus on issues of women and gender in domestic, international, or global contexts, as demonstrated through research and teaching or other achievements. The Core Faculty supports the activities of GenCen and assists in developing and implementing its programs and activities, and are also eligible to serve on the GenCen Advisory Committee.

Consulting Faculty, while having a professional interest in issues of women and gender in domestic, international, or global contexts and activities of the GenCen, usually do not have these interests as the main focus of their research. 

GDG (Gender, Development and Globalization) Faculty will also be either Core or Consulting Faculty and have specific expertise and interest in gender and international development.

GJEC (Gender, Justice and Environmental Change) Faculty may also be either Core or Consulting Faculty, though that is not a requirement. GJEC Faculty are dedicated to teaching and scholarship related to intersections of gender, environmental change, and social and environmental justice; examining these issues from both local and global perspectives.

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