International Studies & Programs

Faculty Directory

The Center for Gender in Global Context currently has more than 275 affiliated faculty members from throughout MSU's campus, across 17 colleges and more than 65 departments and offices.

The GenCen Faculty Directory can be sorted by Name, College, Department, and GenCen Affiliation. Affiliates can be Core, Consulting, GJEC, or GDG Faculty (some members may be both GJEC/GDG and Core or Consulting). Click here to jump to a short description of our Faculty Affiliations.

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Rena Harold
College: Social Science
Department: Social Work
Affiliation: Core
Program:
Email: haroldr(at)msu.edu

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Biography: Rena Harold is a professor and Associate Director of the School of Social Work. Rena's interests are in family and development, including socialization practices of parents and teachers. Rena also has an interest in lesbian parent families, the impact of IT on adolescent development, and practice research, including program evaluation and using qualitative methodology.

LaShawn Harris
College: Social Science
Department: History
Affiliation: Core
Program:
Email: harri859(at)msu.edu

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Biography: LaShawn Harris is an Assistant Professor of History at MSU. Graduated from Howard University's Department of History in 2007, her research interests are 20th Century, Cultural, Labor and Working Class, Social, Urban, Women & Gender in the United States. She is the author of several published articles, including Madame Queen of Policy: Madame Stephanie St. Clair and African American Womens Participation in Harlems Informal Economy in Black Women, Gender & Families; Running with the Reds: African American Women and the Communist Party during the Great Depression in the Journal of African American History; Dream Books, Crystal Balls, and Lucky Numbers: African American Female Spiritual Mediums in Harlem, 1900-1945 in the Journal of Afro-Americans in New York Life and History, and Marvel Cooke: Investigative Journalist, Communist & Black Radical Subject in the Journal for the Study of Radicalism.

Rashida Harrison
College: James Madison College
Department: James Madison College
Affiliation: Core
Program:
Email: harri516(at)msu.edu

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Biography:

Rashida Harrison joined GenCen's affiliated faculty in Fall 2016.

Kenneth Harrow
College: Arts and Letters
Department: English
Affiliation: Core
Program: GDG
Email: harrow(at)msu.edu

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Biography: Kenneth Harrow is Distinguished Professor of English at Michigan State University. He received a B.S. from M.I.T., a Masters in English from NYU and a Ph D in Comparative Literature also from NYU. His work focuses on African cinema and literature, Diaspora and Postcolonial Studies. He is the author of Thresholds of Change in African Literature (Heinemann, 1994), Less Than One and Double: A Feminist Reading of African Womens Writing (Heinemann, 2002), and Postcolonial African Cinema: From Political Engagement to Postmodernism (Indiana U P, 2007). His latest work, Trash! A Study of African Cinema Viewed from Below, was be published by Indiana University Press in 2013. He has edited numerous collections on such topics as Islam and African literature (including Faces of Islam in African Literature,1991), African cinema (including African Cinema: Postcolonial and Feminist Readings, 1999), and women in African literature and cinema. He has published more than 50 articles and a dozen chapters. He has organized numerous conferences dealing with African literature and cinema. He served as President of the African Literature Association, and was honored with their first Distinguished Member Award. He has also been honored with the Distinguished Faculty Award at Michigan State University. In 2011 he was awarded the Distinguished Africanist Award at the Toyina Falola Annual Conference, University of Texas.

Salah Hassan
College: Arts and Letters
Department: English
Affiliation: Consulting
Program:
Email: hassans3(at)msu.edu

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Biography: In addition to his position in English, Salah Hassan is core faculty in the Muslim Studies Program and in Global Studies in the Arts and Humanities at MSU. His areas of research and teaching include postcolonial literature and theory, mid-20th century anticolonial intellectual movements, literatures of empire, and Arab and Muslim North American studies. His research projects have recently been oriented around the representation of Arabs and Muslims in the media and also projects of Arab and Muslim self-representation. He is the founder of the Muslim Subjects website and blog (muslimsubjects.org), and coordinator of the following projects on that site: "Migrations of Islam," "American Halal," and "Journal/Islam." Muslim Subjects was established with grant that he received from the Social Science Research Council in 2011. He co-curated RASHID & ROSETTA, an international online art exhibit on the theme of the Rosetta Stone, and is co-editor of a special issue of MELUS (Winter 2006) on Arab American literature. He co-produced the short documentary film, "Death of an Imam" and is currently producing a series of documentary films on Muslims in the US.

Juliet Hess
College: Music
Department: Music Education
Affiliation: Consulting
Program:
Email: jlhess(at)msu.edu

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Biography: Juliet Hess is assistant professor of music education at Michigan State University's College of Music. Her prior experience includes an appointment as assistant professor of music education at the Setnor School of Music at Syracuse University with a dual appointment in the School of Education. She taught undergraduate and graduate courses in elementary and secondary methods, foundations in music education, assessment in music education, and general music in the inclusive classroom. Hess received her Ph.D. in Sociology of Education from the department of Sociology and Equity Studies in Education at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto. She received her masters and bachelors degree in music education from the University of Toronto. Hesss research interests include anti-oppression education, activism in music and music education, music education for social justice, and the question of ethics in world music study. Her doctoral thesis, Radical Musicking: Challenging Dominant Paradigms in Elementary Music Education, focused on the work of four elementary music teachers who strove to challenge dominant paradigms of music education in their classrooms. She performs as a freelance percussionist, choral musician, and drummer and dancer in Ghanaian performance groups. Her compositional focus is on works for choir and for solo voice and chamber ensemble. A vocal/chamber ensemble work called Cloths of Heaven: 5 Poems of William Butler Yeats was premiered in Toronto, Canada, in March 2015. Her published choral works are geared towards younger singers and are lyrical in nature.

Alexandra Hidalgo
College: Arts and Letters
Department: Writing, Rhetoric, and American Cultures
Affiliation: Core
Program:
Email: hidalgo5(at)msu.edu

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Biography:

Alexandra Hidalgo was born in Caracas, Venezuela and immigrated to the States at the age of 16. That experience has fueled her interests in gender, race, immigration, and memoir, which she explores through alphabetic writing and video scholarship and through her work as a documentary filmmaker. Her first feature documentary Vanishing Borders, the story of four immigrant women living in New York City and transforming their communities with their work, is currently screening at universities and festivals. Her current documentary project is the William and Santiago Documentary Series, a number of short and feature documentaries featuring the lives of her two sons and their relationship to each other. She co-founded and is the editor-in-chief of agnes films, a website that supports the work of women and feminist filmmakers.

Brian Holcomb
College: Arts and Letters
Department: Center for Integrated Studies in the Arts and Humanities
Affiliation: Core
Program:
Email: holcom31(at)msu.edu

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Biography: Dr. Holcomb's research interests include gender studies, queer theory, and narrative theory. His dissertation focused on western works (a study of wit as a queer narrative mechanism in the works of Oscar Wilde, PG Wodehouse, Anita Loos, and Dorothy Parker), and he has recently become interested in Chinese Modernism. At MSU, he teaches multidisciplinary classes that incorporate fiction, drama, and the visual arts to talk about culture. He is particularly interested in online education.

Vanessa Holden
College: Social Science
Department: History
Affiliation: Core
Program:
Email: holdenva(at)msu.edu

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Biography: Dr. Holden is an African Americanist whose work focuses on the experiences of women during slavery in the American South. She is particularly interested in the ways that race, class, gender, and sexuality shaped American history. Dr. Holden is also interested in the comparative study of resistance and rebellion throughout the African diaspora. Dr. Holden is working on a book length manuscript that focuses on the role of African American women and the role of community in the Southampton Rebellion (Nat Turners Rebellion). She is also working on article length pieces that engage the importance of including free people of color and African American children in the study of slave resistance.

Claudia Holzman
College: Human Medicine
Department: Epidemiology and Biostatistics
Affiliation: Core
Program:
Email: holzman(at)msu.edu

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Biography: Claudia Holzman, Professor of Epidemiology in the College of Human Medicine at Michigan State University, received her Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from Michigan State University in 1976, her Masters of Public Health degree from the University of Minnesota in 1986, and her PhD degree in epidemiology from the University of Michigan in 1996. Dr. Holzman has been involved in reproductive and perinatal research, primarily focusing on the areas of preterm delivery, brain injury in neonates, birth defects, and vaginal infections. In 1999 Dr. Holzman was awarded the Teacher/Scholar award from the College of Human Medicine at Michigan State University. Currently Dr. Holzman is a co-investigator of a T-32 training program that supports doctoral and post-doctoral trainees in perinatal/pediatric epidemiology. Dr. Holzman initiated the Pregnancy Outcomes and Community Health (POUCH) Study, which prospectively recruited 3,019 pregnant women in mid-pregnancy from 52 clinics in 5 Michigan communities (1998-2004). The POUCH Study was funded by two consecutive R01s from NICHD and additional support from NINR. The goals of this study are to identify pathways to preterm delivery (e.g. infection, maternal vascular disease) by assessing social and biologic factors. Psychosocial antecedents in the preterm pathways were measured at the individual (participant interview) and ecological (community/ neighborhood conditions and resources) levels. Biologic markers and mediators are being evaluated in maternal serum, plasma, vaginal fluid, urine, saliva, and hair collected at mid-pregnancy. In addition, the study focus includes a detailed examination of the delivered placenta, linking specific pathologic findings to various preterm delivery pathways. An add-on component to the POUCH Study funded an at-home protocol for collection and measurement of stress biomarkers and blood pressure. This portion was supported by a PERI grant, in which Dr. Holzman was one of six international investigators to be funded by the March of Dimes Foundation in their first preterm birth-focused initiative. Later funding for the POUCH Study was garnered from the Thrasher Research Foundation and Centers for Disease Control to support of additional biomarker investigations. Dr. Holzman has also conducted a three-stage investigation of the epidemiology of bacterial vaginosis (BV) in non-pregnant women that was funded by Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Michigan Foundation. The first study was a cross-sectional assessment of risk factors for BV in 498 women in the Greater Lansing Area. A second study consisted of small focus groups of women who had recurrent BV. A third pilot study was a small clinical trial of douching cessation designed to assess the effects of vaginal douching on changes in vaginal flora.


What do our Faculty Affiliations Mean?

Core Faculty have a strong continuing professional focus on issues of women and gender in domestic, international, or global contexts, as demonstrated through research and teaching or other achievements. The Core Faculty supports the activities of GenCen and assists in developing and implementing its programs and activities, and are also eligible to serve on the GenCen Advisory Committee.

Consulting Faculty, while having a professional interest in issues of women and gender in domestic, international, or global contexts and activities of the GenCen, usually do not have these interests as the main focus of their research. 

GDG (Gender, Development and Globalization) Faculty will also be either Core or Consulting Faculty and have specific expertise and interest in gender and international development.

GJEC (Gender, Justice and Environmental Change) Faculty may also be either Core or Consulting Faculty, though that is not a requirement. GJEC Faculty are dedicated to teaching and scholarship related to intersections of gender, environmental change, and social and environmental justice; examining these issues from both local and global perspectives.

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