International Studies & Programs

Faculty Directory

The Center for Gender in Global Context currently has more than 275 affiliated faculty members from throughout MSU's campus, across 17 colleges and more than 65 departments and offices.

The GenCen Faculty Directory can be sorted by Name, College, Department, and GenCen Affiliation. Affiliates can be Core, Consulting, GJEC, or GDG Faculty (some members may be both GJEC/GDG and Core or Consulting). Click here to jump to a short description of our Faculty Affiliations.

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Steven McCornack
College: Communication Arts and Sciences
Department: Communication
Affiliation: Core
Program:
Email: mccornac(at)msu.edu

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Biography: Dr. Steven McCornack is a leading researcher in the domains of relational deception and deceptive discourse production. His contributions to deception scholarship include the McCornack-Parks Model of Deception Detection, the Probing Effect, Information Manipulation Theory (IMT), IMT2, and the McCornack Falsification Probability Curve. Dr. McCornack is the author of the interpersonal communication textbooks Reflect and Relate and Interpersonal Communication and You, and the human communication text Choices and Connections. He has received numerous awards for teaching excellence, including the 2013 NCA Ecroyd Award for Outstanding Teaching in Higher Education, a Lilly Endowment Teaching Fellowship, the Amoco Foundation Excellence-in-Teaching Award, the MSU Teacher/Scholar Award, and the MSU Alumni Association Excellence-in-Undergraduate-Teaching Award. Steve was the 1999 and 2010 MSU Nominee for Carnegie Foundation U.S. Professor of the Year. Dr. McCornack has been at MSU since the Fall of 1988, and currently serves as Coordinator for the Undergraduate Program, Honors Advisor, and Faculty Advisor to the Undergraduate Communication Association. His primary responsibilities as Undergraduate Coordinator are to approve credit transfers from outside institutions, review waiver requests, and resolve student problems.

Susan Linz
College: Social Science
Department: Economics
Affiliation: Core
Program: GDG
Email: linz(at)msu.edu

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Biography: Dr. Linz's research interests lie in economic transition, changing labor market conditions, business/economic conditions, entrepreneurship, and influence of personality traits/attitudes on employee performance. Her CV and more information is available at http://econ.msu.edu/faculty/linz/

Maria Lapinski
College: Communication Arts and Sciences
Department: Communication
Affiliation: Core
Program: GDG
Email: lapinsk3(at)msu.edu

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Biography: Dr. Maria Lapinski is joint-appointed as a Professor in the Department of Communication and Michigan Ag-Bio Research at Michigan State University (MSU). She is currently serving as the Associate Dean for Research for the College of Communication Arts and Sciences and in this role facilitates interdisciplinary research partnerships and identification of funding sources for faculty research. Dr. Lapinski received her doctorate in 2000 from MSU and her Master of Arts from University of Hawaii, Manoa. Her research examines the impact of messages and social-psychological factors on health and environmental risk behaviors with a focus on culturally-based differences and similarities. To this end, Dr. Lapinski has conducted collaborative research projects with her students and colleagues in a number of countries in Asia, the Pacific Rim, Central America, and Africa. Her work has been presented at national and international communication and public health conferences, published in refereed journals including The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Health Communication, Communication Monographs, and others. Her research has been funded by agencies such as the National Science Foundation, World Health Organization, National Institutes of Health, and United States Department of Agriculture. Her favorite courses to teach are International Health Communication, Risk Communication, and Health Communication for Diverse Populations.

Maureen McDonough
College: Agriculture and Natural Resources
Department: Forestry
Affiliation: Core
Program: GJEC
Email: mcdono10(at)msu.edu

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Biography: Dr. Maureen McDonough is a professor emeritus in Forest Sociology and Social Forestry. Dr. McDonough's research interests are in the applications of social science to natural resource issues. Specific interests include public education about forest management, understanding nonforestry publics and participatory small-scale forestry.

Leslie Moch
College: Social Science
Department: History
Affiliation: Core
Program: GDG
Email: leslie(at)msu.edu

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Biography: I am an historian of European migration interested in movement since I was born in Seattle and headed out to camp as a kid, then to universities in Switzerland, Connecticut and Michigan and moved to upstate New York, Michigan, Illinois, Texas, and back to Michigan. Trained as an historian of France, I have written on France and Western Europe, and have now explored the history of migration in Russia. From this last venture will appear Broad Is My Native Land: Repertoires and Regimes of Migration in Russia's Twentieth Century, coauthored with Lewis Siegelbaum (Cornell U.P., 2014) a follow-up to The Pariahs of Yesterday: Breton Migrants in Paris (Duke U.P., 2012) and Moving Europeans: Migration in Western Europe since 1650 (Indiana U.P., 2003).

Terese Guinsatao Monberg
College: Residential College in the Arts and Humanities
Department: Residential College in the Arts and Humanities
Affiliation: Consulting
Program: GDG
Email: tmonberg(at)msu.edu

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Biography: Terese Guinsatao Monberg is a rhetorician interested in methods for locating, excavating, making public, and mobilizing the institutional memories of historically underrepresented groups, with a specific focus in Asian Pacific American and Filipina/o American rhetorical and historical legacies. More broadly, Terese's work examines the recursive relationships between rhetoric and culture, history and social justice movements, collective identities and civic participation. In addition to being on the faculty in the RCAH, Terese is a core faculty member in Rhetoric and Writing, and an affiliated faculty member in the Asian Pacific American (APA) Studies Specialization. Terese is currently working on a book-length project tracing the emergence of the community-based Filipino American National Historical Society in relationship to larger economic, social, and global changes impacting Filipino American communities after World War II. In a second and related project, she is looking at the role of home and place in designing civic engagement initiatives. Terese is a third-generation (mestiza/hapa/mixed race) Filipina American and among the first generation in her family to finish college. She grew up in Chicago.

Merry Morash
College: Social Science
Department: Criminal Justice
Affiliation: Core
Program: GDG
Email: morashm(at)msu.edu

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Biography: Dr. Merry Morash is a Professor of Criminal Justice at Michigan State University with expertise in the areas of Women Offenders and Applied Research. She has enjoyed an extensive career in criminal justice that includes having directed and provided services in community-based juvenile, court, and prison aftercare programs along the Eastern Seaboard to positions consulting and training with state and local criminal justice agencies on gender-responsive corrections, organizational change, and assistance to crime victims. For two decades, she has concentrated on correctional programming for women offenders, management strategies for correctional agencies that focus on women, and assessment of recidivism risk across girls' and women's pathways to crime. Early in her career, Dr. Morash was part of a group that founded a children's visitation program in a Michigan women's correctional facility; and in 2010, she authored the book, Women on Probation and Parole: A Feminist Critique of Community Programs and Services that focuses on gender responsive and traditional probation and parole strategies for women offenders.

Nathalie Me-Nsope
College: Agriculture and Natural Resources
Department: Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics/Global Center for Food Systems Innovation
Affiliation: Core
Program: GJEC
Email: mensopen(at)msu.edu

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Biography: Dr. Me-Nsope joined the AFRE faculty at Michigan State University (MSU) in 2015 as an Assistant Professor, International Development. She is currently working with the Food Security Research Group, and her most recent activities include: analyzing the nutritional impact of staple food substitution in West Africa using quantitative methods; conducting case studies to understand how smallholder rice and cassava farmers in Ghana link to profitable markets; and a qualitative assessment of the impacts of USAID/Yaajeendes Pass on the Gift program, a Feed the Future project designed to reduce malnutrition in Senegals northeastern zones through the gifting of animals. Prior to graduate studies at MSU, Dr. Me-Nsope studied gender and development in Cameroon and in the United Kingdom, and was later employed with the Gender and Development Unit of INSER and Gender Lenses (LLC) in Cameroon. Since 2013, she has been serving as the Gender Lead for the Global Center for Food Systems Innovation (GCFSI), a USAID Innovation Lab at MSU. Dr. Me-Nsope has been part of several efforts to improve gender integration in agricultural programs and policies targeting household food security, nutrition and poverty through agricultural value chain development in West, Central and Southern Africa. She is familiar with USAID guidelines for gender integration in agricultural programs, and has provided technical assistance to USAID agricultural programs. She recently conducted gender analysis of agricultural value chains (Malawi, Mali, Chad, and Ghana) to inform the design of value chain interventions that will improve food systems outcome, reduce gender inequalities and empower women.

Sandra Logan
College: Arts and Letters
Department: English
Affiliation: Core
Program: GDG
Email: logans(at)msu.edu

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Biography: Sandra Logan is faculty adviser for the "Early Modern at MSU" graduate student group, and serves on the Steering Committee for the Global Literary and Cultural Studies Research Cluster from 2004-2009, and served as Acting Director of Global Studies in the Arts and Humanities in 2008. She was nominated by the department of English for the 2009 MSU Teacher-Scholar award. Her research includes the history and theory of drama (including Shakespeare), poetry and poetics, historiography, and women writers, and focuses especially on questions of gender, class, nation, and social formations. Her first book, Text /Events in Early Modern England: Poetics of History (Ashgate Publishing, 2007) explores early modern strategies of authority, authorship, and social formation by examining the uses of hypotyposis and other rhetorical strategies in multiple accounts of Elizabethan and pre-Tudor events. She has two new book-length projects underway: States of Exception: Systemic Violence and Subjective Liminality in Early Modern England,which considers the implications of the early modern states explicit and implicit exercise of violence in subject/state relations; and Poetics of Silence: Shakespeare, Mummery, and Early Cinema, which situates the mediating representational strategies of silent Shakespeare films in relation to broader questions of interpretation, adaptation, and circulation. In addition, she has published articles and essays on early modern class and systemic violence, the literary and historical elision of womens rule, Shakespeares audiences and staged mediation, and virtual travel in early modern texts. She has received research awards including the Intramural Research Grant from MSU (2004-5 and 2009-10), a Fellowship from the Folger Shakespeare Library (2007), and Newberry Library Early Modern Studies Consortium funding, which have supported research residencies at the Newberry Library, the Folger Library, the British Library, and the British Film Institute. In both her teaching and research, she endeavors to use theoretical and literary texts of the past to reflect on critical, social, and political questions of the present.

Ann Larabee
College: Arts and Letters
Department: Writing, Rhetoric, and American Cultures
Affiliation: Core
Program:
Email: larabee(at)msu.edu

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Biography: Ann Larabee received her PhD from the Binghamton University, and has taught at Michigan State University since 1988. Her dissertation was on women's theater and drama in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and she is known for her pioneering work on the drama of Djuna Barnes and Susan Glaspell. In more recent years, she has been interested in the relationships among technology, culture, and media. In 2000, she published Decade of Disaster, which examines cultural responses to technological disasters, from the Challenger Space Shuttle disaster to the Bhopal chemical leak. Professor Larabee remains interested in the cultural impact and representation of disasters. She is currently at work on a historical study of bomb-making among radical groups, exploring issues of technology transfer, constitutional restraints on speech, and the institutional boundaries placed around dangerous knowledge and instruction. With Professor Arthur Versluis, Professor Larabee is co-editor of the Journal for the Study of Radicalism, featuring interdisciplinary scholarly work on global radical movements. Professor Larabee is considered an expert on the history of terrorism and has contributed to the formation of the historiography of this emerging field. In 2008, as an offshoot of her larger study of radicalism and technology, she published The Dynamite Fiend, a biography of a Confederate agent who attempted to use a time bomb to blow up transatlantic passenger ships. Professor Larabee also publishes in the field of media studies, and is especially interested in the global mediascape. Professor Larabee has overseen dissertations in women and technological invention, cultural studies and radicalism, media and violence, and global media forms. She teaches modern and contemporary literature, drama, literary survey and introductory humanities.


What do our Faculty Affiliations Mean?

Core Faculty have a strong continuing professional focus on issues of women and gender in domestic, international, or global contexts, as demonstrated through research and teaching or other achievements. The Core Faculty supports the activities of GenCen and assists in developing and implementing its programs and activities, and are also eligible to serve on the GenCen Advisory Committee.

Consulting Faculty, while having a professional interest in issues of women and gender in domestic, international, or global contexts and activities of the GenCen, usually do not have these interests as the main focus of their research. 

GDG (Gender, Development and Globalization) Faculty will also be either Core or Consulting Faculty and have specific expertise and interest in gender and international development.

GJEC (Gender, Justice and Environmental Change) Faculty may also be either Core or Consulting Faculty, though that is not a requirement. GJEC Faculty are dedicated to teaching and scholarship related to intersections of gender, environmental change, and social and environmental justice; examining these issues from both local and global perspectives.

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