International Studies & Programs

Faculty Directory

The Center for Gender in Global Context currently has more than 275 affiliated faculty members from throughout MSU's campus, across 18 colleges and more than 65 departments and offices.

The GenCen Faculty Directory can be sorted by Name, College, Department, and GenCen Affiliation. Affiliates can be Core, Consulting, GJEC, or GDG Faculty (some members may be both GJEC/GDG and Core or Consulting). Click here to jump to a short description of our Faculty Affiliations.

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Nwando Achebe
College: Social Science
Department: History
Affiliation: Core
Program: GDG
Email: achebe(at)msu.edu

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Biography: Nwando Achebe (pronounced: Wan-do Ah-chě-bě; [pronunciation key: ě as in pet]) is an award-winning author, professor of history, and Faculty Excellence Advocate (FEA) for the College of Social Science. She is the founding editor-in-chief of the new Journal of West African History, published by Michigan State University Press; member of the African Studies Association’s (ASA) Board of Directors, and past co-convenor of ASA’s Women’s Caucus. She is convenor of the April 8-9, 2016 Journal of West African History International Launch Conference. Nwando Achebe’s research interests involve the use of oral history in the study of women, gender, and sexuality in Nigeria.

Michael Boivin
College: Osteopathic Medicine
Department: Neurology and Ophthalmology
Affiliation: Consulting
Program: GDG
Email: boivin(at)msu.edu

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Biography: A former Fulbright research scholar to the DR Congo (1990-91) and Uganda (2003-04), Dr. Boivin presently leads R34 MH082663; Cognitive and psychosocial benefits of caregiver training in Ugandan HIV children. He is also leading a study in Uganda on the cognitive rehabilitation of school-age Ugandan children affected by HIV (R34 MH084782, Neuropsychological Benefits of Cognitive Training in Ugandan HIV Children. He has led the neurodevelopmental assessment portions of an NIH R21 study on the neurocognitive effects of HIV subtype in Ugandan children (PI: Wong), and on a K01 study on the neurodevelopmental and factors affecting neurocognitive disability in rural Ugandan children affected by HIV (PI: Brahmbhatt). He recently published studies in evaluating cognitive rehabilitation programs in Ugandan school-age children with HIV and those having survived cerebral malaria. Presently Dr. Boivin is collaborating on studies evaluating the neurcognitive effects of cerebral malaria in Malawian and in Ugandan children, as well as the developmental effects of maternal anemia in very young children in Benin.

Lisa Biggs
College: Residential College in the Arts and Humanities
Department: Residential College in the Arts and Humanities
Affiliation: Core
Program:
Email: biggslis(at)msu.edu

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Biography: Lisa Biggs is a performing artist and performance scholar. She earned a BA in Theatre and Dance at Amherst College, an MA in Playwriting and Performance Studies from New York University, and most recently completed a PhD in Performance Studies at Northwestern University. Building off her diverse experiences as an artist and activist, Lisa's current scholarship stands at the intersection of Performance Studies, Black Studies, Women and Gender Studies, Anthropology and Law. Recent publications include an analysis of Rhodessa Jones's solo play Big-Butt Girls, Hard-Headed Women for the anthology Solo/Black/Woman, edited by E. Patrick Johnson and Ramon Rivera-Servera (2013). Her ongoing interest in the performance of justice, law enforcement and prisoner rehabilitation is now expressed through research on the impact of theatre and dance programs for incarcerated women confined in the US and South Africa, and new collaborations with people whose lives are touched in other ways by criminal legal systems.

John Aerni-Flessner
College: Residential College in the Arts and Humanities
Department: Residential College in the Arts and Humanities
Affiliation: Consulting
Program:
Email: aernifl1(at)msu.edu

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Biography: John Aerni-Flessner earned a BA in History from Grinnell College in Iowa. He taught high school in rural Lesotho (a country in southern Africa) and in the Yup'ik Eskimo village of Kwethluk, Alaska before returning to graduate school. He earned a PhD in African and World History from Washington University in St. Louis and taught at SUNY Cortland in Upstate New York before coming to Michigan State. His main research focuses on how ordinary people grappled with the idea of independence in mid-20th century Africa, and how they came to terms with their changing relations to the state during the decolonization process. As a social historian, his classes tend to focus on big ideas like nationalism, slavery, sport/leisure, development, etc. and then examine how ordinary people interacted with these ideas, were changed by the ideas, and how they were able to change them in subtle ways.

Michael Bratton
College: Social Science
Department: Political Science
Affiliation: Consulting
Program: GDG
Email: mbratton(at)msu.edu

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Biography:

Michael Bratton is University Distinguished Professor of Political Science and African Studies at Michigan State University. He is the author of five books, most recently Voting and Democratic Citizenship in Africa (Boulder: Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2013) and over sixty articles and chapters, including in The American Journal of Political Science, World Politics, Comparative Politics, Comparative Political Studies, World Development, The Journal of Democracy, and The British Journal of Political Science. He is also a founder, former executive director, and now senior advisor to the Afrobarometer, a cross-national survey research project on public opinion in Africa. He teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in comparative and African politics.

Angela Calabrese Barton
College: Education
Department: Teacher Education
Affiliation: Core
Program: GJEC
Email: acb(at)msu.edu

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Biography: Angela Calabrese Barton is a professor in teacher education. Her research focuses on issues of equity and social justice in science education, with a particular emphasis on the urban context. Drawing from qualitative and critical/feminist methodologies, she conducts ethnographic and case study research in urban community- and school- based settings that targets the science teaching- learning experiences of three major stakeholder groups: upper elementary and middle school youth, teachers learning to teach science for social justice, and parents engaging in their childrens science education. She also engages in curriculum research and development that links nutrition and science literacies in the upper elementary and middle school classroom. She is currently co- editor for the Journal of Research in Science Teaching.

Cheryl Caesar
College: Arts and Letters
Department: Writing, Rhetoric, and American Cultures
Affiliation: Consulting
Program:
Email: caesarc(at)msu.edu

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Biography: Cheryl Caesar is an Assistant Professor, teaching Preparation for College Writing. Her background is in comparative literature, and she wrote her doctoral thesis on Leo Tolstoy and Anne Tyler at the Sorbonne. She is interested in culture studies, and works with colleagues to develop new translingual and transcultural curricula for the PCW and FYW classrooms. She is the WRAC department steward for the Union of Non-Tenured Faculty.

Stephanie Amada
College: Arts and Letters
Department: Writing, Rhetoric, and American Cultures
Affiliation: Core
Program:
Email: amada(at)msu.edu

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Biography:

A professor of writing and rhetoric at Michigan State University, Stephanie teaches in MSU's First-Year Writing Program and Professional Writing Program. In addition to teaching first-year writing, Stephanie Amada focuses on women's studies, and has done extensive research on hook-up culture, especially on college campuses. She is a graduate of the University of Pittsburgh and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Marcia Aldrich
College: Arts and Letters
Department: English
Affiliation: Core
Program:
Email: aldrich(at)msu.edu

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Biography:

Marcia Aldrich currently teaches creative writing at Michigan State University. From 2008 to 2011 she edited Fourth Genre, one of the premiere literary journals featuring personal essays and memoirs. She has received the Excellence in Teaching Award, sponsored by the Amoco Foundation and the MSU Alumni Club of Mid-Michigan Quality in Undergraduate Teaching Award. In 2010 she was named Distinguished Professor of the Year by the Presidents Council, State Universities of Michigan. She is the author of the free memoir Girl Rearing, published by W.W. Norton, selected as a Barnes and Noble Discover New Writers Series, and subsequently cited in Notable Twentieth Century American Literary Nonfiction, in The Best American Essays of The Century, edited by Joyce Carol Oates (Houghton Mifflin). Several of the memoir essays from Girl Rearing were selected for recognition as Notable Essays in the Best American Essay series.

Safoi Babana-Hampton
College: Arts and Letters
Department: Romance and Classical Studies
Affiliation: Core
Program: GDG
Email: babanaha(at)msu.edu

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Biography: Safoi Babana-Hampton is Associate Professor of French in the department of Romance and Classical Studies at Michigan State University. Her primary areas of teaching and research are 20th and 21st century French and Francophone literatures and film. Her book Reflexions littraires sur lespace public marocain dans loeuvre d'Abdellatif Labi (Summa Publications, 2008) critically examines of the role of culture in the construction of civic consciousness and the formation of a modern public space in Morocco. Her current research project is a comparative study of images of multicultural and transnational citizenship in literary and filmic productions from the Maghreb and the Maghrebi diaspora in France.


What do our Faculty Affiliations Mean?

Core Faculty have a strong continuing professional focus on issues of women and gender in domestic, international, or global contexts, as demonstrated through research and teaching or other achievements. The Core Faculty supports the activities of GenCen and assists in developing and implementing its programs and activities, and are also eligible to serve on the GenCen Advisory Committee.

Consulting Faculty, while having a professional interest in issues of women and gender in domestic, international, or global contexts and activities of the GenCen, usually do not have these interests as the main focus of their research. 

GDG (Gender, Development and Globalization) Faculty will also be either Core or Consulting Faculty and have specific expertise and interest in gender and international development.

GJEC (Gender, Justice and Environmental Change) Faculty may also be either Core or Consulting Faculty, though that is not a requirement. GJEC Faculty are dedicated to teaching and scholarship related to intersections of gender, environmental change, and social and environmental justice; examining these issues from both local and global perspectives.

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